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Happy Halloween 2015

Happy Halloween 2015

Did you jump? Good. That means you’re alive and possess a healthy sense of fear and fun. What better day of the year than Halloween to indulge in all the dark delight of a good scare? For some, the glow of a Jack-o’-lantern is enough to induce goosebumps. Others seek out the terrifying words of a ghost story, or the visceral thrill of a classic monster movie. Whatever you decide to do, have fun and do it safely.

While you’re getting your fright on tonight, remember that on November 1 we set our clocks back one hour. Time it just right and you can have two midnights tonight – that’s an extra witching hour for your enjoyment. Happy Halloween!

Wildlife Photographers of the Year 2015

The list of all the winners is posted on the Natural History Museum’s Website, take a look at the amazing photographs submitted, they are stunning.
I have sampled some of my personal favorites to share with you, they are absolutely amazing, Enjoy!

Coral Bleaching Events

Evidence of Coral Bleaching

Evidence of Coral Bleaching

Coral bleaching is the loss of intracellular endosymbionts (Symbiodinium, also known as zooxanthellae) through either expulsion or loss of algal pigmentation. The corals that form the structure of the great reef ecosystems of tropical seas depend upon a symbiotic relationship with algae-like unicellular flagellate protozoa that are photosynthetic and live within their tissues. Zooxanthellae give coral its coloration, with the specific color depending on the particular clade. Some scientists consider bleaching a poorly-understood type of “stress” related to high irradiance; environmental factors like sediments, harmful chemicals and freshwater; and high or low water temperatures. This “stress” causes corals to expel their zooxanthellae, which leads to a lighter or completely white appearance, hence the term “bleached”. Bleaching has been attributed to a defense mechanism in corals; this is called the “adaptive bleaching hypothesis,” from a 1993 paper by Robert Buddemeier and Daphne Fautin. Bleached corals continue to live, but growth is limited until the protozoa return.
— Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_bleaching
There are massive coral bleaching events that show the dire condition of our oceans. This can have significant impact on life on the planet beyond just the oceans.
NOAA declares third ever global coral bleaching event [READ REPORT]
October 6, 2015 - NOAA Coral Reef Watch

October 2015-January 2016: NOAA’s standard 4-month bleaching outlook shows a threat of bleaching continuing in the Caribbean, Hawaii and Kiribati, and potentially expanding into the Republic of the Marshall Islands. (Credit: NOAA)


October 6, 2015 - NOAA Coral Reef Watch

February-May 2016: An extended bleaching outlook showing the threat of bleaching expected in Kiribati, Galapagos Islands, the South Pacific, especially east of the dateline and perhaps affecting Polynesia, and most coral reef regions in the Indian Ocean.